Meet the Creative Team

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Meet the Creative Team

July 18, 2017

Shannon Chu

Designer

You used to make comics?

As a kid, I loved the LA Times comics and got really into drawing, so my parents enrolled me into an art class where we would choose an image we liked and replicate it. From there, I was like ‘I want to be a cartoonist!’, so I joined my high school newspaper as a cartoonist. Usually, we would try to make the editorial cartoons and comic strips relevant to what was happening around campus. If final exams were going on, we would make it about finals. If there wasn’t something super big going on we would have creative liberty, as long as it was appropriate. 

Did you continue journalism in college?

I did, but not as a cartoonist. I did layout design. With layout design, for the most part, there is a strict formula, but there were special issues and features where you had more creative liberty. I was also in a group called Berkeley Innovation that focused on doing human-centered design projects around the bay area, and a group called Blueprint that made websites for non-profits organizations pro bono. They really care about what they do and care about using tech for good, which I found really inspiring. 

You did a lot of human-centered design projects at Berkeley. Can you tell me more about that?

The first project I ever seriously worked on was a toy building kit for kids. We talked to kids, figured out what they liked, built prototypes, and tested them out with kids and parents. There was also some mechanical engineering involved because they wanted these toys to have motors and things that could move.

I also worked on a project to re-imagine a slum in Jakarta. Jakarta is sinking around 3 inches per year. That is a huge problem, especially in the slums, because they're all located in areas that are prone to flooding. We worked on floatable housing concepts and made 3D models of concept homes. We had to think about their culture and lifestyle and about what materials and designs wouldn’t be invasive to their culture because you don’t want to just build something that isn’t going to work for them and their livelihoods.

How do you feel about the Kardashians?

I don’t particularly like them, but for some reason I’m fascinated. I think it’s because they seem so otherworldly. I have no idea what it’s like to be them, and maybe watching their show is a small glimpse into their experience. 

John Gatewood

Producer

How long have you been welding?

18 or 19 years. I used to teach classes at the Crucible in West Oakland, a wonderful place to learn. I learned to weld there and then I became a teaching assistant for my mentor, David Friedhelm. I would TA his classes and then I became a studio manager, which at the Crucible means that when there’s an open studio they need people on site to make sure everyone is safe. When working with fire and electricity, you really need to be safe.

Tell us about blacksmithing.

It’s actually a very different skill set. In blacksmithing, as one of my teachers used to say, ‘never work past a mistake’. You have to pay attention to every step to get the end result you want. It’s very complicated. It’s not quick. It’s hard work and it takes a lot of thought and practice. 

People tend to think blacksmithing is all about muscle, and it’s not. Yes, it obviously takes strength. But it’s really about finesse and position and form. You're not going to muscle through a piece of steel. It’s a much more disciplined art form. You are going to have to work with it, and that takes finesse. It takes some strength, but it doesn’t take Schwarzenegger strength to do it.

Do you have your own anvil?

Actually I do now. I have my grandfathers anvil. It’s a small anvil because he was a machinist. I brought it back from Texas when we cleaned out my Grandma's house. I don’t really use it. 

Tell us about your Instagram?

I use Instagram to tell stories. When I take pictures here in the city, I’m telling stories about what San Francisco is, or at least what it is to me. I see these little eruptions of creativity on blank walls and I want to share them, because I think people have this innate drive to create and to share their creations with others. It’s part of what makes us human. 

Who are your creative influences?

My mother was a news photographer and my father was a writer, reporter and editor. I learned storytelling from them. When I talk about being able to tell a story, it goes back to how they told stories, both in written word and photography. 

Charlene Wang

3D Artist

You’ve drawn pictures of everyone in the office. When did you start drawing?

When I was little, I really liked drawing characters like princes and princesses that fall in love, like in stories. I just kept drawing, and I know it was wrong, but I would do it even during class. In China, all the students are under a lot of stress from studying, and I felt like I needed to give up drawing and focus on studying to get into college. 

When did you know you wanted to be an artist?

In school, there were a lot of students that were really good at math, but I really liked art. When you asked me what I was going to do in the future I always knew I was interested in design and art. My grades were great, but I think I kind of was disappointing my parents. I didn’t want to work in accounting or finance. It wasn’t my dream.

When did you start working in 3D?

Six years ago. The college I went to in China was an art college. I started out doing 2D animation with Flash and drawing things frame by frame in Photoshop. After two years, I learned 3D outside of college in a training program. They taught me Maya. That was my first 3D software.

You got your masters at the Academy of Art?

Yes, in 3D animation. I’m old. After I graduated, I still spent time at school helping my friend finish their final thesis. I met J, our Creative Director, at our university job fair. 

Lindsey von Thron

Producer

You started your career working in sports?

I started out as a multi-media production assistant, which meant I was cutting highlights of games as they were happening and putting them on our website. I was also working in conjunction with the studio to help fill content for the studio shows.

Around the time Youtube had first come out, our president of the company got really into finding funny videos to post to gain traffic. We would look for blooper-type moments in a game. For example, during a Notre Dame game, the mascot was running out onto the field with a big flag. The cheerleader did a flip and got tangled in a flag. We cut that and made a funny little clip of it. 

I also ran these digital exclusive road trip shows. During the football season, we had teams of two basically on the road the entirety the season. We picked what match-ups we wanted them to go to and then found stories at those schools. We had them all over the country going to different games. I developed the stories for them, set up interviews and arranged access for them to shoot wherever we needed to shoot. I also coordinated where they needed to stay and helped with technical issues in editing. 

Did you get to hold the mic?

I made some on-camera appearances. But when I was in front of the camera, it was more man-on-the-street style fan stuff.

Tell me about what a shoot day is like?

No two shoot days are ever the same. A shoot day typically starts pretty early in the morning with the crew call about an hour to an hour and a half before we start shooting so we have time to unload gear, set up for the first shot and make sure we have everything in order for the day. 

Setting up for the shots can be a fun challenge. Typically, we try to scout the locations beforehand so we have an idea of how we want to set up, but sometimes the light’s totally different than it was the day we scouted, the weather might be different, or there is some other element that makes you have to think on your feet. I think that’s the most fun part of shoot days, having to think on your feet. It’s fun to interact with the crew and be creative with them setting up the various shots, whether it be through prop styling or the performances of the people. Interacting with and encouraging the the talent is always rewarding. When they nail their performances, it's a good time. 

What are your travel ambitions?

On my short list: Antarctica, Argentina, Peru and Machu Picchu and the Galapagos. 

Abby Sherman

Photographer

How did you get into photography?

Snowboarding. I took a photography class in high school and I was already really involved in snowboarding. I have been a hardcore athlete my whole life. I used to go to snowboarding camp in the winters. I found out at my camp there was a photo program and I was like ‘that’s AWESOME’. They got to work with TransWorld which is one of the most popular snowboarding magazines. 

The whole thing was really expensive so I had to work for it, but they let me use all of their lenses which I wouldn't have had access to otherwise. I learned so much about Lightroom and cameras. I was like ‘I love this’ and my mom bought me my first camera and I knew I wanted to do this forever. When I started looking at colleges, I was only thinking about photography and found The Academy of Art. I have some really cool photos from when I first realized I was creative that I'm really proud of.

Tell us about working as an intern.

In college I did a lot of research on agencies and actually reached out a year before I interviewed to work here. They thought it was so cool that I followed up. In my interview we talked about fishing. I think that's what got me hired. 

I was a student at the time and I worked the two days a week where I didn’t have classes. I started officially last June, and worked from June until the end of August as an intern before I came on full-time.

 

What's your typical day like.

It depends on what we are doing. I guess I don’t have a typical day. I am usually just bouncing around. If we’re busy in production, then I am retouching. If the creative department has something for me to retouch, then I’ll do that. If there is a photoshoot, I usually come in early, so if the call time is at 8, I am here at 7 or 6:30. If there isn’t a photoshoot, I am retouching, and I start at 3PM. Otherwise, someone might send me out to go shoot something in the city, and then I start whenever they need me. My days are always different.

Zaid Abouzeid

3D Artist

When did you start working in 3D?

I started doing 3D eight years ago and only did it for a couple of months before I realized it was extremely difficult and was going to take some time to master. For the next eight years, I went back and forth between working on photography projects and working in 3D. My background in photography helped me develop in 3D. For example, I learned lighting and photography which gave me a good foundation when I went back to 3D.  

Which do you prefer?

They are different. In 3D you have more room to manipulate objects. For example, in 3D you can influence the way an object reflects light, but you can’t do that in photography. What I don’t like about 3D is that you can spend a whole day trying to get an object to look the way it should, where as in photography you just shoot it and it is immediately right. I love artists that mix photography and 3D, and that’s where I want my work to go in the future. 

You started working at XYZ in our LA office?

I was working as a retoucher at XYZ in Los Angeles. I did retouching in LA for about a year. I worked mostly on cars.

Abbey Yacoe

Web Developer

What kind of drawing are you working on?

I’ve been working with charcoal for the past few months and have been trying to re-create these renaissance style drawings that I've been fascinated with lately. They've all ended up coming out kind of deranged, which I’m not upset about.

Before charcoal, I worked mostly with this thick pilot calligraphy pen that I was obsessed with. I would draw these really messy ink portraits of people. Lots of black around the eyes and nose, which always makes people look 100 years older than they are or like they're having the worst day of their life. 

Charcoal is a huge mess. Ideally when something good is finished, my hands, the drawing and the carpet should all be almost ruined. The downside is I’ve had an inch layer of charcoal dust in my room and up my nose for the past month.  

You've spent a lot of time sleeping on buses?

No, well. I played trumpet in a traveling drum corps called the Vanguard. It was a lot like being in the circus, roving around random midwestern towns, performing five times a day for strangers. When we finished performing for the night, we would pack up our stuff and drive off to the next town, try to get as much sleep as you could in your bus seat, and wake up the next day to start all over again. I was on tour for a total of nine months with this group. At first I was really good at sleeping on buses, but I can’t do it anymore.

What is the deal with you and textbooks?

I’m really into alternative education and the unSchooling movement. I think textbooks should be free and really admire people, especially in the computer science community, who write textbooks on their specialty, and I am especially inspired by the young people around me who are attempting to create intellectual communities that they feel are authentic. I love higher education, but appreciate those that cultivate the curiosity to explore STEM and the arts outside of the classroom.

I have a giant collection of textbooks that people have uploaded for free online. There’s maybe 500 of them in a drive. I share it with anyone who even expresses a remote interest. I feel like the Johnny Appleseed of textbooks, but nobody else seems to see it that way, just like when nobody believes me when I tell them I’m like the female James Dean.

J Walton

Creative Director

What were you thinking about when you first started building the Creative team?

Building a team is an interesting challenge. It’s rewarding and it’s fun to do. Eventually it comes down to personalities of the people that you find. You’re trying to build a team that you would want to spend a lot of time with. Because that's definitely going to happen. 

What kind of work do you want to do going forward?

I want to always be working on stuff that looks great and gets people thinking. I love character animation. I love storytelling. I love film as well. What kind of work do I want to do in a year or 10 years or 20 years is all the same answer. Well, in 20 years I think I’ll be in front of a Walmart, just saying 'hi' to people, but let’s say 10 years, I think the industry changes so quickly what’s interesting now is going to be totally different, but being able to do interesting work that pushes boundaries and looks great is something I’m always interested in.

Tell me about your career. What creative role haven’t you done yet?

There’s not much. Actually. I started out as a designer. Self-taught. I was running errands for this company but I spent all the time I possibly could standing behind their designer. I started taking her VHS training tapes home and watching them and sneaking them back. Then she left all of a sudden so I decided I'd step in and finish her projects. I was pretty much making nothing so it was a great deal for the company. 

After that, I went to help start a printing company. I was prepress and design and sales – because that goes well together. And then the other fella was production. He ran the press and owned the company and he would take all the proceeds. And that’s how we split our duties. I learned a lot there. I went from there to a place that I loved that did movie posters and then I got more into the advertising market, and got more familiar with all the agencies and what kind of work they do. I was mainly doing color and compositing. But from the very beginning of my career, even as a designer, I was really interested in 3D. That was part of my work from the very beginning.

Tell me about your work in color.

I got really deep into color correction for photography. I spent many, many years focusing my attention on that. When I started getting more into moving pictures, color grading film was sort of just natural for me. I worked at a production company that was shooting constantly and graded almost everything they did. It gave me a great chance to hone my skills, and figure out how to apply my photography techniques and theories to film. My grading technique is really different from most colorists for that reason.

I really love color. And it’s a lot of fun to be able to move something around really quickly and create different emotions. Color in a film can do a lot of what a soundtrack does, which is move you emotionally without you really noticing, but it is so critical to storytelling.

And now you are here. 

It’s a great challenge: Building a creative team where there was not one before. And a real creative culture with a team that likes each other and does great work. It’s going great so far. 

Dog Tax

Shannon Chu

Designer

You used to make comics?

As a kid, I loved the LA Times comics and got really into drawing, so my parents enrolled me into an art class where we would choose an image we liked and replicate it. From there, I was like ‘I want to be a cartoonist!’, so I joined my high school newspaper as a cartoonist. Usually, we would try to make the editorial cartoons and comic strips relevant to what was happening around campus. If final exams were going on, we would make it about finals. If there wasn’t something super big going on we would have creative liberty, as long as it was appropriate. 

Did you continue journalism in college?

I did, but not as a cartoonist. I did layout design. With layout design, for the most part, there is a strict formula, but there were special issues and features where you had more creative liberty. I was also in a group called Berkeley Innovation that focused on doing human-centered design projects around the bay area, and a group called Blueprint that made websites for non-profits organizations pro bono. They really care about what they do and care about using tech for good, which I found really inspiring. 

You did a lot of human-centered design projects at Berkeley. Can you tell me more about that?

The first project I ever seriously worked on was a toy building kit for kids. We talked to kids, figured out what they liked, built prototypes, and tested them out with kids and parents. There was also some mechanical engineering involved because they wanted these toys to have motors and things that could move.

I also worked on a project to re-imagine a slum in Jakarta. Jakarta is sinking around 3 inches per year. That is a huge problem, especially in the slums, because they're all located in areas that are prone to flooding. We worked on floatable housing concepts and made 3D models of concept homes. We had to think about their culture and lifestyle and about what materials and designs wouldn’t be invasive to their culture because you don’t want to just build something that isn’t going to work for them and their livelihoods.

How do you feel about the Kardashians?

I don’t particularly like them, but for some reason I’m fascinated. I think it’s because they seem so otherworldly. I have no idea what it’s like to be them, and maybe watching their show is a small glimpse into their experience. 

John Gatewood

Producer

How long have you been welding?

18 or 19 years. I used to teach classes at the Crucible in West Oakland, a wonderful place to learn. I learned to weld there and then I became a teaching assistant for my mentor, David Friedhelm. I would TA his classes and then I became a studio manager, which at the Crucible means that when there’s an open studio they need people on site to make sure everyone is safe. When working with fire and electricity, you really need to be safe.

Tell us about blacksmithing.

It’s actually a very different skill set. In blacksmithing, as one of my teachers used to say, ‘never work past a mistake’. You have to pay attention to every step to get the end result you want. It’s very complicated. It’s not quick. It’s hard work and it takes a lot of thought and practice. 

People tend to think blacksmithing is all about muscle, and it’s not. Yes, it obviously takes strength. But it’s really about finesse and position and form. You're not going to muscle through a piece of steel. It’s a much more disciplined art form. You are going to have to work with it, and that takes finesse. It takes some strength, but it doesn’t take Schwarzenegger strength to do it.

Do you have your own anvil?

Actually I do now. I have my grandfathers anvil. It’s a small anvil because he was a machinist. I brought it back from Texas when we cleaned out my Grandma's house. I don’t really use it. 

Tell us about your Instagram?

I use Instagram to tell stories. When I take pictures here in the city, I’m telling stories about what San Francisco is, or at least what it is to me. I see these little eruptions of creativity on blank walls and I want to share them, because I think people have this innate drive to create and to share their creations with others. It’s part of what makes us human. 

Who are your creative influences?

My mother was a news photographer and my father was a writer, reporter and editor. I learned storytelling from them. When I talk about being able to tell a story, it goes back to how they told stories, both in written word and photography. 

Charlene Wang

3D Artist

You’ve drawn pictures of everyone in the office. When did you start drawing?

When I was little, I really liked drawing characters like princes and princesses that fall in love, like in stories. I just kept drawing, and I know it was wrong, but I would do it even during class. In China, all the students are under a lot of stress from studying, and I felt like I needed to give up drawing and focus on studying to get into college. 

When did you know you wanted to be an artist?

In school, there were a lot of students that were really good at math, but I really liked art. When you asked me what I was going to do in the future I always knew I was interested in design and art. My grades were great, but I think I kind of was disappointing my parents. I didn’t want to work in accounting or finance. It wasn’t my dream.

When did you start working in 3D?

Six years ago. The college I went to in China was an art college. I started out doing 2D animation with Flash and drawing things frame by frame in Photoshop. After two years, I learned 3D outside of college in a training program. They taught me Maya. That was my first 3D software.

You got your masters at the Academy of Art?

Yes, in 3D animation. I’m old. After I graduated, I still spent time at school helping my friend finish their final thesis. I met J, our Creative Director, at our university job fair.

Lindsey von Thron

Producer

You started your career working in sports?

I started out as a multi-media production assistant, which meant I was cutting highlights of games as they were happening and putting them on our website. I was also working in conjunction with the studio to help fill content for the studio shows.

Around the time Youtube had first come out, our president of the company got really into finding funny videos to post to gain traffic. We would look for blooper-type moments in a game. For example, during a Notre Dame game, the mascot was running out onto the field with a big flag. The cheerleader did a flip and got tangled in a flag. We cut that and made a funny little clip of it. 

I also ran these digital exclusive road trip shows. During the football season, we had teams of two basically on the road the entirety the season. We picked what match-ups we wanted them to go to and then found stories at those schools. We had them all over the country going to different games. I developed the stories for them, set up interviews and arranged access for them to shoot wherever we needed to shoot. I also coordinated where they needed to stay and helped with technical issues in editing. 

Did you get to hold the mic?

I made some on-camera appearances. But when I was in front of the camera, it was more man-on-the-street style fan stuff.

Tell me about what a shoot day is like?

No two shoot days are ever the same. A shoot day typically starts pretty early in the morning with the crew call about an hour to an hour and a half before we start shooting so we have time to unload gear, set up for the first shot and make sure we have everything in order for the day. 

Setting up for the shots can be a fun challenge. Typically, we try to scout the locations beforehand so we have an idea of how we want to set up, but sometimes the light’s totally different than it was the day we scouted, the weather might be different, or there is some other element that makes you have to think on your feet. I think that’s the most fun part of shoot days, having to think on your feet. It’s fun to interact with the crew and be creative with them setting up the various shots, whether it be through prop styling or the performances of the people. Interacting with and encouraging the the talent is always rewarding. When they nail their performances, it's a good time. 

What are your travel ambitions?

On my short list: Antarctica, Argentina, Peru and Machu Picchu and the Galapagos. 

Abby Sherman

Photographer

How did you get into photography?

Snowboarding. I took a photography class in high school and I was already really involved in snowboarding. I have been a hardcore athlete my whole life. I used to go to snowboarding camp in the winters. I found out at my camp there was a photo program and I was like ‘that’s AWESOME’. They got to work with TransWorld which is one of the most popular snowboarding magazines. 

The whole thing was really expensive so I had to work for it, but they let me use all of their lenses which I wouldn't have had access to otherwise. I learned so much about Lightroom and cameras. I was like ‘I love this’ and my mom bought me my first camera and I knew I wanted to do this forever. When I started looking at colleges, I was only thinking about photography and found The Academy of Art. I have some really cool photos from when I first realized I was creative that I'm really proud of.

Tell us about working as an intern.

In college I did a lot of research on agencies and actually reached out a year before I interviewed to work here. They thought it was so cool that I followed up. In my interview we talked about fishing. I think that's what got me hired. 

I was a student at the time and I worked the two days a week where I didn’t have classes. I started officially last June, and worked from June until the end of August as an intern before I came on full-time.

 

What's your typical day like.

It depends on what we are doing. I guess I don’t have a typical day. I am usually just bouncing around. If we’re busy in production, then I am retouching. If the creative department has something for me to retouch, then I’ll do that. If there is a photoshoot, I usually come in early, so if the call time is at 8, I am here at 7 or 6:30. If there isn’t a photoshoot, I am retouching, and I start at 3PM. Otherwise, someone might send me out to go shoot something in the city, and then I start whenever they need me. My days are always different.

Zaid Abouzeid

3D Artist

When did you start working in 3D?

I started doing 3D eight years ago and only did it for a couple of months before I realized it was extremely difficult and was going to take some time to master. For the next eight years, I went back and forth between working on photography projects and working in 3D. My background in photography helped me develop in 3D. For example, I learned lighting and photography which gave me a good foundation when I went back to 3D.  

Which do you prefer?

They are different. In 3D you have more room to manipulate objects. For example, in 3D you can influence the way an object reflects light, but you can’t do that in photography. What I don’t like about 3D is that you can spend a whole day trying to get an object to look the way it should, where as in photography you just shoot it and it is immediately right. I love artists that mix photography and 3D, and that’s where I want my work to go in the future. 

You started working at XYZ in our LA office?

I was working as a retoucher at XYZ in Los Angeles. I did retouching in LA for about a year. I worked mostly on cars.

Abbey Yacoe

Web Developer

What kind of drawing are you working on?

I’ve been working with charcoal for the past few months and have been trying to re-create these renaissance style drawings that I've been fascinated with lately. They've all ended up coming out kind of deranged, which I’m not upset about.

Before charcoal, I worked mostly with this thick pilot calligraphy pen that I was obsessed with. I would draw these really messy ink portraits of people. Lots of black around the eyes and nose, which always makes people look 100 years older than they are or like they're having the worst day of their life. 

Charcoal is a huge mess. Ideally when something good is finished, my hands, the drawing and the carpet should all be almost ruined. The downside is I’ve had an inch layer of charcoal dust in my room and up my nose for the past month.  

You've spent a lot of time sleeping on buses?

No, well. I played trumpet in a traveling drum corps called the Vanguard. It was a lot like being in the circus, roving around random midwestern towns, performing five times a day for strangers. When we finished performing for the night, we would pack up our stuff and drive off to the next town, try to get as much sleep as you could in your bus seat, and wake up the next day to start all over again. I was on tour for a total of nine months with this group. At first I was really good at sleeping on buses, but I can’t do it anymore.

What is the deal with you and textbooks?

I’m really into alternative education and the unSchooling movement. I think textbooks should be free and really admire people, especially in the computer science community, who write textbooks on their specialty, and I am especially inspired by the young people around me who are attempting to create intellectual communities that they feel are authentic. I love higher education, but appreciate those that cultivate the curiosity to explore STEM and the arts outside of the classroom.

I have a giant collection of textbooks that people have uploaded for free online. There’s maybe 500 of them in a drive. I share it with anyone who even expresses a remote interest. I feel like the Johnny Appleseed of textbooks, but nobody else seems to see it that way, just like when nobody believes me when I tell them I’m like the female James Dean.

J Walton

Creative Director

What were you thinking about when you first started building the Creative team?

Building a team is an interesting challenge. It’s rewarding and it’s fun to do. Eventually it comes down to personalities of the people that you find. You’re trying to build a team that you would want to spend a lot of time with. Because that's definitely going to happen. 

What kind of work do you want to do going forward?

I want to always be working on stuff that looks great and gets people thinking. I love character animation. I love storytelling. I love film as well. What kind of work do I want to do in a year or 10 years or 20 years is all the same answer. Well, in 20 years I think I’ll be in front of a Walmart, just saying 'hi' to people, but let’s say 10 years, I think the industry changes so quickly what’s interesting now is going to be totally different, but being able to do interesting work that pushes boundaries and looks great is something I’m always interested in.

Tell me about your career. What creative role haven’t you done yet?

There’s not much. Actually. I started out as a designer. Self-taught. I was running errands for this company but I spent all the time I possibly could standing behind their designer. I started taking her VHS training tapes home and watching them and sneaking them back. Then she left all of a sudden so I decided I'd step in and finish her projects. I was pretty much making nothing so it was a great deal for the company. 

After that, I went to help start a printing company. I was prepress and design and sales – because that goes well together. And then the other fella was production. He ran the press and owned the company and he would take all the proceeds. And that’s how we split our duties. I learned a lot there. I went from there to a place that I loved that did movie posters and then I got more into the advertising market, and got more familiar with all the agencies and what kind of work they do. I was mainly doing color and compositing. But from the very beginning of my career, even as a designer, I was really interested in 3D. That was part of my work from the very beginning.

Tell me about your work in color.

I got really deep into color correction for photography. I spent many, many years focusing my attention on that. When I started getting more into moving pictures, color grading film was sort of just natural for me. I worked at a production company that was shooting constantly and graded almost everything they did. It gave me a great chance to hone my skills, and figure out how to apply my photography techniques and theories to film. My grading technique is really different from most colorists for that reason.

I really love color. And it’s a lot of fun to be able to move something around really quickly and create different emotions. Color in a film can do a lot of what a soundtrack does, which is move you emotionally without you really noticing, but it is so critical to storytelling.

And now you are here. 

It’s a great challenge: Building a creative team where there was not one before. And a real creative culture with a team that likes each other and does great work. It’s going great so far. 

Dog Tax

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