Meet the Summer Interns

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Meet the Summer Interns

Carlie Meyers

How old were you when you started making art? 

About five-and-a-half. My parents wanted to get me involved in a bunch of different things so I tried karate, ballet, tap and I was really bad at everything. Art was one thing I really enjoyed. From a very young age, I wanted to be a famous artist, which is a thing that I think all young people want. High School was where I really realized art was my passion and when I decided to be an art major in college my family was really supportive. Some families would be like ‘No, do business!’ 

We are all impressed here by your sense of aesthetics. You have a really specific style.

Thats nice to hear. I’ve really just started playing around with style. I am a very technical person. I really like the materials and doing detailed stuff so only recently I’ve extended into abstract work.

You’re like Picasso. 

Yeah! A lot of artists started out really realistic and they got really abstract. 

I feel like it wouldn’t be difficult for you to be at least Instagram famous.

It’s a lifelong dream.

What do you study at Cal Poly?

My concentration is Studio Art. There is a lot of variety to my upper level classes, like figure drawing. They bring in nude models which is really fun, it was awkward at first but then it became really cool. In advanced studio, I am free do whatever I want. Our teachers are really open. 

What kind of work have you gravitated towards?

I like colored pencil the best, but I am trying to improve my painting because the professor that I respect the most at our school is a fantastic painter.

You didn’t really have much digital experience before XYZ.

No. I took photoshop classes at CalPoly and I really liked it. I also have a lot of experience retouching my own photographs because I am a terrible photographer and need to do a lot of retouching to make them look cool. The learning curve was ridiculously huge. The first week was a challenge because I don’t know much about file structure or any of the details involved in retouching. I hadn’t worked much with InDesign in the past.

Where do you feel like you are at now?

So much better. I have learned so much. If I had to go back and look at what I did on my first day I would be embarrassed. For instance, they told me to remove some hairs, and I just went in with a blur brush and tried to removing everything. I have learned a lot, especially about color correcting. With my formal training I can visually see if something is good or bad, but now I know about how to get there and how to make something look good on the screen.

What’s next for you?

Finishing school. I love photoshop and I have had a great summer and it’s passed by super fast. This company is really fun. I mean the yoga and all the snacks and everyone here has been so helpful. They are all friendly. I was really worried to ask questions and everyone said I could at first, but no one has gotten wary of it the whole time which is really nice. In college, I was pretty stressed about what I was going to do as a studio artist because I didn’t necessarily want to teach, but now I have this skill-set and it feels like something I would like to do for a living.

Renee Palermo

What was your concentration at CalPoly?

It’s called Design Reproduction Technology. 

What does that mean?

It means that we do a lot of pre-flighting. It’s creating designs that will be exported or printed correctly. For instance, making sure resolution is correct and making sure when you save it out it works properly.

 

That is incredibly specific. 

It seems that way, but there are a variety of projects we get to do, and it’s interesting to learn the complexity behind different kinds of projects and why there is so much variety. We also get to learn why creating designs in a certain way is going to be beneficial in the long run. A lot of it is learning to put the end in mind while you are designing. 

Tell us about your project constructing these books.

It was a quarter long class for one of our Graphic Communication (GrC) classes. We learned how to manipulate the text on the page so it looks proper when its produced, paginated and stitched all together. We also learned the process of binding the books. After the quarter was completed, we had a physical book. 

It’s very tedious work. We start out by finding the raw text, which is just the book in plaintext on one giant line. You place all of the block of text info the document and then you start playing with the letting and the margins. You use the master page to create page furniture, which can have the authors name and page number, etc. We take all the variations into account into several samples. Every time we did a sample, we would critique them in class.

How long did the project take?

The whole quarter and several all nighters. The whole process was agonizingly long. At least 200 hours. My book was bigger than the ones she recommended which might have been a mistake.

How much do you interact with clients at XYZ?

Every day and we interact with the print producers for the clients as well. 

Is there a lot of hand holding or do you get to own it?

I get to own it. As emails come up they come to all of us so we get to snag jobs as they are available. So I get to say ‘I’ll take care of this’. But just recently I was put on as the main point of contact for two clients so I am pretty excited. I also turn 22 tomorrow and starting on officially full-time at XYZ on Monday. So it’s an exciting time.

Carlie Meyers

How old were you when you started making art? 

About five-and-a-half. My parents wanted to get me involved in a bunch of different things so I tried karate, ballet, tap and I was really bad at everything. Art was one thing I really enjoyed. From a very young age, I wanted to be a famous artist, which is a thing that I think all young people want. High School was where I really realized art was my passion and when I decided to be an art major in college my family was really supportive. Some families would be like ‘No, do business!’ 

We are all impressed here by your sense of aesthetics. You have a really specific style.

Thats nice to hear. I’ve really just started playing around with style. I am a very technical person. I really like the materials and doing detailed stuff so only recently I’ve extended into abstract work.

You’re like Picasso. 

Yeah! A lot of artists started out really realistic and they got really abstract. 

I feel like it wouldn’t be difficult for you to be at least Instagram famous.

It’s a lifelong dream.

What do you study at Cal Poly?

My concentration is Studio Art. There is a lot of variety to my upper level classes, like figure drawing. They bring in nude models which is really fun, it was awkward at first but then it became really cool. In advanced studio, I am free do whatever I want. Our teachers are really open. 

What kind of work have you gravitated towards?

I like colored pencil the best, but I am trying to improve my painting because the professor that I respect the most at our school is a fantastic painter.

You didn’t really have much digital experience before XYZ.

No. I took photoshop classes at CalPoly and I really liked it. I also have a lot of experience retouching my own photographs because I am a terrible photographer and need to do a lot of retouching to make them look cool. The learning curve was ridiculously huge. The first week was a challenge because I don’t know much about file structure or any of the details involved in retouching. I hadn’t worked much with InDesign in the past.

Where do you feel like you are at now?

So much better. I have learned so much. If I had to go back and look at what I did on my first day I would be embarrassed. For instance, they told me to remove some hairs, and I just went in with a blur brush and tried to removing everything. I have learned a lot, especially about color correcting. With my formal training I can visually see if something is good or bad, but now I know about how to get there and how to make something look good on the screen.

What’s next for you?

Finishing school. I love photoshop and I have had a great summer and it’s passed by super fast. This company is really fun. I mean the yoga and all the snacks and everyone here has been so helpful. They are all friendly. I was really worried to ask questions and everyone said I could at first, but no one has gotten wary of it the whole time which is really nice. In college, I was pretty stressed about what I was going to do as a studio artist because I didn’t necessarily want to teach, but now I have this skill-set and it feels like something I would like to do for a living.

Renee Palermo

What was your concentration at CalPoly?

It’s called Design Reproduction Technology. 

What does that mean?

It means that we do a lot of pre-flighting. It’s creating designs that will be exported or printed correctly. For instance, making sure resolution is correct and making sure when you save it out it works properly.

 

That is incredibly specific. 

It seems that way, but there are a variety of projects we get to do, and it’s interesting to learn the complexity behind different kinds of projects and why there is so much variety. We also get to learn why creating designs in a certain way is going to be beneficial in the long run. A lot of it is learning to put the end in mind while you are designing. 

Tell us about your project constructing these books.

It was a quarter long class for one of our Graphic Communication (GrC) classes. We learned how to manipulate the text on the page so it looks proper when its produced, paginated and stitched all together. We also learned the process of binding the books. After the quarter was completed, we had a physical book. 

It’s very tedious work. We start out by finding the raw text, which is just the book in plaintext on one giant line. You place all of the block of text info the document and then you start playing with the letting and the margins. You use the master page to create page furniture, which can have the authors name and page number, etc. We take all the variations into account into several samples. Every time we did a sample, we would critique them in class.

How long did the project take?

The whole quarter and several all nighters. The whole process was agonizingly long. At least 200 hours. My book was bigger than the ones she recommended which might have been a mistake.

How much do you interact with clients at XYZ?

Every day and we interact with the print producers for the clients as well. 

Is there a lot of hand holding or do you get to own it?

I get to own it. As emails come up they come to all of us so we get to snag jobs as they are available. So I get to say ‘I’ll take care of this’. But just recently I was put on as the main point of contact for two clients so I am pretty excited. I also turn 22 tomorrow and starting on officially full-time at XYZ on Monday. So it’s an exciting time.

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